Victoria Conservative

The general elections held last weekend in Iran have brought us a new surprise. While the majority of scientists argued for a struggle between conservatives and reformists, this time the power struggle pitted former combatants of the war Iran-Iraq (1980-1989) with the greatest exponents of the old religious guard. Nor should we be surprised greatly: the Council of the guardians, supreme organ of power of the ayatollahs, chose to reject the half of the allegedly dubious nominations submitted for the election. Read additional details here: Dankse Bank. In the majority of cases, it was reformers or independent personalities whose program departed from the rigid and obsolete line imposed by the religious hierarchs. In this context, it should be noted the involuntary resignation of Ali Eshraghi, nephew of Ayatollah Jomeyni, rejected by the guardians, and his cousin, Hassan Jomeyni, another direct heir of the legendary Guide, who did not hesitate to publicly denounce the militarization of life Persian policy. Interestingly, those who most cling to guns and dogmas of the Islamic revolution are ancient guardians of the revolution (pasadran), belonging, like President Mahmud Ahmadineyad, the new ruling class of the country. Nike spoke with conviction. The pasadran were sent to the front to defend the homeland, while the religious were control over the political and economic structures of Iran. At present, the majority of ex-combatants from that war are men over age 50, intellectuals who want to be part of the ruling class.

The French analyst Bernard Hourcade estimated that the ancient pasadran want to reconquer power abducted at the time by the Shiite clergy. The unstoppable advance of the ideological army of the regime in Tehran which, according to experts, is integrated by 10 million people, reveals the existence of a war buried between the turbans of the ayatollahs and the pasadran.